Bibliography and links updates

As I try to put my notes in order by the end of this year, I changed a series of references, most notably in the bibliography and in the links sections.

Bibliography

I just updated the bibliography, using new categories. I divided the references in two main sections:

Corpus Linguistics, Complexity and Readability Assessment

Background

Links

First of all, I updated the links section using the W3C Link Validator. It is very useful, as it points out dead links and moved pages.

Resources for German

This is a new subsection:

Other links

I added a subsection to the links about LaTeX: LaTeX for Humanities (and Linguists).

I also added new tools and new Perl links.

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Find and delete LaTeX temporary files

This morning I was looking for a way to delete the dispensable aux, bbl, blg, log, out and toc files that a pdflatex compilation generates. I wanted it to go through directories so that it would eventually find old files and delete them too. I also wanted to do it from the command-line interface and to integrate it within a bash script.

As I didn’t find this bash snippet as such, i.e. adapted to the LaTeX-generated files, I post it here :

find . -regex ".*\(aux\|bbl\|blg\|log\|nav\|out\|snm\|toc\)$" -exec rm -i {} \;

This works on Unix, probably on Mac OS and perhaps on Windows if you have Cygwin installed.

Remarks

  • Find goes here through all the directories starting from where you are (.), it could also go through absolutely all directories (/) or search your Desktop for instance (something like \$Home/Desktop/).
  • The regular expression captures files ending with the (expandable) given series of letters, but also files with no extension which end with it (like test-aux).
    If you want it to stick to file extensions you may prefer this variant :
    find . \( -name "*.aux" -or -name "*.bbl" -or -name "*.blg" ... \)
  • The second part really removes the files that ...
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A few links on producing posters using LaTeX

As I had to make a poster for the TALN 2011 conference to illustrate my short paper (PDF, in French), I decided to use LaTeX, even if it was not the easiest way. I am quite happy with the result (PDF).

I gathered a few links that helped me out. My impression is that there are two common models, and as I matter of fact I saw both of them at the conference. The one that I used, Beamerposter, was “made in Germany” by Philippe Dreuw, from the Informatics Department of the University of Aachen. I only had to adapt the model to fit my needs, which is done by editing the .sty file (it is self-explanatory).

The other one, BA Poster, was “made in Switzerland” by Brian Amberg, from the Computer Science Department of the University of Basel.

And here are the links :

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